BUKO

Young coconut is called buko. Its flesh is soft, thin and silky — you can easily scrape it off with a spoon. In contrast, the flesh of a mature coconut is niyog, which is thick and hard and needs to be grated off the shell.

Buko (Young Coconut)

There is a favorite flavor combination in the Philippines called buko pandan, which is tender white coconut and fragrant screwpine leaves.

Buko Pandan Jelly Mix
Buko Pandan Gulaman

Read on for another meaning of the word buko


NIYOG

Buwig ng Niyog

 

niyog
coconut

bao ng niyog
coconut shell

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MACAPUNO

also spelled makapuno
(literally meaning “almost like full”)

"Freak" Coconut Macapuno

macapuno
chewy, soft coconut meat

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HALUHALO INGREDIENTS

A popular Filipino treat with Japanese origins, haluhalo consists of a blend of fruits, sweet preserves, evaporated milk, and shaved ice. It is frequently topped with a scoop of ice cream. The name literally means “Mix-Mix” referring to the hodgepodge of ingredients.

Haluhalo Espesyal


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KASTANIYOG / CASTANIYOG

A piece of niyog (mature coconut) roasted on live charcoals.

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KAYOD

This Tagalog word has at least two related meanings.


kayod
grating, scraping

kayurin
to scrape, grate

Kayurin ang niyog.
“Grate the coconut.”
Scrape coconut meat off the shell.

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BAO

This word has many meanings.

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BUNOT

This word has different meanings depending on which syllable is accented.

Bunót (accented on the second syllable) refers to a coconut husk commonly used to polish floors. You place your foot on it and use your leg power to move in such a way as to scrub the floor.

Bunot of the Philippines

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