KAPAMPANGAN

Kapampangan or Capampan͠gan refers to the language and people of Pampanga province. It is also known as Pampango or Pampangueño. A woman from Pampanga is called a Pampangueña.
 

Kapampangan ka ba?
Are you a native of Pampanga?

Marunong ka bang magsalita ng Kapampangan?
= Marunong ka bang mangapampangan?
Do you know how to speak Capampangan?


Note that Kapampangan is NOT a mere dialect, but a language very distinct from Tagalog.


Click here for examples of Kapampangan words and phrases!


Filipino? Tagalog? Pilipino?

The basis for the Philippine national language is Tagalog, which had primarily been spoken only in Manila and the surrounding provinces when the Commonwealth constitution was drawn up in the 1930s. That constitution provided for a national language, but did not specifically designate it as Tagalog because of objections raised by representatives from other parts of the country where Tagalog was not spoken. It merely stated that a national language acceptable to the entire populace (and ideally incorporating elements from the diverse languages spoken throughout the islands) would be a future goal. Tagalog, of course, by virtue of being the lingua franca of those who lived in or near the government capital, was the predominant candidate.

Continue reading “Filipino? Tagalog? Pilipino?”

Ilocano or Ilokano

Ilocano is a language very distinct from Tagalog. Variously spelled as Ilocano, Ilokano, Ilukano, Ilucano, Iluko, Iloco or Iloko, it is the third most-spoken language in the Philippines. Continue reading “Ilocano or Ilokano”

Basic Cebuano Phrases

Sebuwano is a language very distinct from Tagalog, but we get enough inquiries about Cebuano that we decided to list a few basic phrases.

Continue reading “Basic Cebuano Phrases”

Tagalog Words from the Spanish

MGA SALITANG HIRAM SA KASTILA

It’s been estimated that about 40 percent of Tagalog / Filipino words in use today are derived from Spanish.

Continue reading “Tagalog Words from the Spanish”

Mga Salitang Hiram sa Wikang Tsino

Mga Salitang Filipino na Hiram sa Wikang Tsino

sungki = protruding tooth

bimpo – face towel

bakya = wooden clog

hikaw = earrings

husi = cloth woven from silk thread or fibers

lawlaw = dangling downward, loose

susi = key

tanglaw = light

Continue reading “Mga Salitang Hiram sa Wikang Tsino”

Chinese Loan Words in Tagalog

sungki = protruding tooth

bimpo = face towel

bakya = wooden clog

hikaw = earrings

husi = cloth woven from silk thread or fibers

lawlaw = dangling downward, loose

Continue reading “Chinese Loan Words in Tagalog”

Hiligaynon

Known popularly as Ilonggo, the Hiligaynon language is spoken in Western Visayas in the Philippines.  It is very distinct from Tagalog.
Continue reading “Hiligaynon”