CALAMANSI / KALAMANSI

Calamansi

Calamansi (spelled kalamansi in native Tagalog orthography) is a small, very round citrus fruit that’s ubiquitous in the Philippines. The fruits are often used when the thin rind is still green on the outside, and that is the color associated with it.

Continue reading “CALAMANSI / KALAMANSI”


The Best Filipino Cookbooks?

When pressed to define Filipino food in one word, we’re apt to say “fusion.” Philippine cuisine bears the influence of our neighbors in Asia and the Pacific, as well as our colonial rulers from far-off lands throughout history. Our dishes and snacks incorporate recipes, ingredients and cooking styles with roots in Malay, Chinese, and Iberian (Spanish & Portuguese) cultures, among many others. These rich layers of influence make our food somewhat unique.

But our cuisine doesn’t merely reflect foreign influence — it of course showcases our local values as well. The enduring appeal of Filipino dishes like adobo, sinigang, and kare-kare is proof that our meals are focused on the ulam being traditionally served at the center of a table in sizes to share. This social, family- oriented approach to meals is truly Filipino.

Explore and discover the true Filipino goodness of the cuisine we call our own. Recreate classic recipes at home and find ingredients to bring your meals to life. 🙂


Filipino cookbooks with recipes from the Philippine islands

Each region of the Philippines has its own distinct food culture, just like the regional differences so common in the United States. The Filipino Cookbook is a collection of 85 tried-and-tested recipes, including from Pampanga, the Visayas, and Mindanao — pinakbet (sauteed vegetables with shrimp paste), paella (rice and seafood medley), morcon (stuffed beef roll), pininyahang manok (pineappled chicken)…

Continue reading “The Best Filipino Cookbooks?”

Top 10 Chinese New Year Food in the Philippines

Any special foods eaten in the Philippines during the great Chinese holiday? Of course there are many! Settlers from China have been living on the Philippine islands for centuries even before the Spaniards arrived and there wouldn’t be modern Filipino culture without the Chinese influence, particularly on the food.

Shin Shin Tikoy

TIKOY

Tikoy is the most popular treat during Lunar New Year festivities in the Philippines, as iconic as the Chinese New Year’s cake nian gao is in other countries. In fact, tikoy is said to be based on the nian gao of southern China from where Fukienese immigrants to the Philippines came.

Slices of Ube Tikoy
Slices of Ube Tikoy

It is made from sticky or glutinous rice which is ground into flour and then mixed with lard, water and sugar. Using white sugar produces white tikoy and using brown sugar produces brown tikoy. Other popular flavors include green pandan and purple ube.

Even non-Chinese Filipinos buy tikoy in boxes during this time of year to give to business associates. Store-bought tikoy is chilled in the refrigerator to make it easy to slice into small pieces. The tikoy slices are dipped in a bowl of beaten eggs and then fried in oil.

Tikoy Slices, Cooked
Tikoy Slices, Cooked

Tikoy is sweet and sticky enough to keep the Kitchen God’s mouth shut. Offering tikoy keeps him from saying anything bad about you!

PANSIT 

Uncut noodles are served for long life. The two favorite noodle dishes during the Chinese New Year in the Philippines are pancit bihon and pancit canton.

Pancit Bihon

A WHOLE FISH

To invite wealth and happiness in the upcoming year, dishes are served that are homophones for words that signify good fortune. For example, the Chinese word for “fish” sounds like the word “surplus” as in a surplus of weath.

Whole Fish for Chinese New Year
Whole Fish for Chinese New Year

POMELOS, ORANGES, PINEAPPLES

The most popular fruit during Chinese New Year is mandarin oranges or tangerines because of their round shapes and golden color. Because oranges were not widely grown in the Philippines and were only imported in recent decades, suha (the local pomelo, sort of like a large grapefruit with a very thick rind) has became the Philippine fruit that one gives away or serves to visitors during the Chinese New Year season. As for the pineapple, it resembles the word for “prosperity” in Hokkien, the Chinese language of most Tsinoys.

BOILED DUMPLINGS

Dumplings are served because luck is symbolically wrapped inside. And the shape of certain dumplings is reminiscent of the shape of gold ingots in ancient China.

Continue reading “Top 10 Chinese New Year Food in the Philippines”

What Is Filipino Food?

It is a question not easy to answer. Is it pork adobo, brown and rich, eaten with hot white rice? Is it siomai and siopao in the neighborhood merendero? Is it chicken relleno on a fiesta table, stuffed with olives and sausages? Is it sinigang na kanduli in a broth misty with miso? Is it a buko pie or a chicken salad? Is it all of the above?


Excerpted from LASA: A Guide to Dining in the Provinces (1990) by Doreen Fernandez and Edilberto Alegre.

What is Filipino Food?

It is a question not easy to answer. Is it pork adobo, brown and rich, eaten with hot white rice? Is it siomai and siopao in the neighborhood merendero? Is it chicken relleno on a fiesta table, stuffed with olives and sausages? Is it sinigang na kanduli in a broth misty with miso? Is it a buko pie or a chicken salad? Is it all of the above?

Continue reading “What Is Filipino Food?”

Popular Filipino Dishes

To help familiarize our website’s visitors with Filipino food in an easy way, we’ve drawn up a simple list of a few Philippine dishes and foodstuff commonly eaten in the Philippines. We’re still working on adding more pronunciation audio and photos. Remember to check back soon! 🙂

Chicken Adobo - Filipino Food

Adobo: pork or chicken marinated in soy sauce and vinegar

 
BALUT: Filipino duck egg

Balut: duck egg with a developed embryo

Continue reading “Popular Filipino Dishes”

HALUHALO INGREDIENTS

A popular Filipino treat with Japanese origins, haluhalo consists of a blend of fruits, sweet preserves, evaporated milk, and shaved ice. It is frequently topped with a scoop of ice cream. The name literally means “Mix-Mix” referring to the hodgepodge of ingredients.

Haluhalo Espesyal


Continue reading “HALUHALO INGREDIENTS”

LONGGANISA (Filipino Sausage)

Frequently misspelled longanisa, the Filipino name comes from the Spanish word longaniza, referring to a type of spicy cold pork sausage.

You can easily buy prepared longganisa. It is tricky to make yourself because you will need a curing agent like potassium nitrate and a lot of things could go wrong. Regardless of whether you make it yourself or buy it from a reputable store, cook the sausage thoroughly to prevent food poisoning. Continue reading “LONGGANISA (Filipino Sausage)”

KROPEK

kropeck / kropek
seafood crackers, fish crackers, prawn crackers

Continue reading “KROPEK”