PAPAK

This Tagalog word in Chinese in origin.

papak
to eat without rice

kumakain ng ulam na walang kasamang kanin
eating ulam without the accompaniment of rice

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LIHI

Kalagayan ng mga babaeng nagbubuntis.

lihí
the state of being pregnant

maglihi
to conceive

paglihihan
to have a craving for during pregnancy

naglilihi
in that stage of pregnancy when one craves certain foods

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KULIT

pagkamapilit, pagpupumilit; pagtitiyaga, pagtataman; pananatili, pamamalagi; sigasig, sigsa

kulit
stubbornness, peskiness

Ang kulit niya!
He/She just keeps nagging me, bothering me.

makulit
importunate

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PASALUBONG

Ang pasalubong ay isang alaala o “souvenir” na ibinigay ng bagong dating na galing sa paglalakbay sa ibang pook o bansa.

root word: salubong (to welcome)

pasalubong
homecoming treat, souvenir

When Filipinos go on a trip or live overseas, they are expected to bring back gifts on their return.  That’s pasalubong!

It’s a big deal. If you don’t bring pasalubong to people who welcome you, they’ll think you never thought of them while you were away.

Peanut Kisses & Peanut Fingers
Pasalubong from Bohol: Peanut Kisses & Peanut Fingers

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GAYUMA

atraksiyong mahiwaga, gamot na pampaibig; matinding pang-akit, halina

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Bahala Na!

Bahala Na! is a Tagalog expression that perfectly encapsulates the typical Filipino attitude towards life. Continue reading “Bahala Na!”

KAWAWA

root word: awa

kawawa
pitiful, poor

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PASMA

There is a “folk illness” in the Philippines called pasmá. There is no equivalent medical term in English or Spanish.

The symptoms of pasmá are trembling hands and sweaty palms occurring after strenuous use of the hands in manual labor. Farmers who work in the fields dragging plows, women who handwash laundry, pianists, and athletes frequently suffer from pasmá. Their hands become pasmado (“spasmodic”).
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