MALANDI

root word: landi

malandi
flirtatious, sensuous

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PAMAHIIN

Ano ang pamahiin?

Ang pamahiin ay paniniwala na hindi nakabatay sa katwiran o kaalaman. A superstition is a belief with no basis in reason or knowledge.

May pamahiin na nagsasabing ang mga sugat na natamo sa Mahal na Araw ay hindi kailanman gagaling. There is a superstition that says that a wound suffered during Good Friday will never ever heal.

pamahiín
superstitition

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TAMPO

hinampo, maktol; sama ng loob sa isang kaibigan

tampo
sulking, holding a grudge

magtampo
to sulk

matampuhin
prone to sulking

tampurorot / tampururot
tampopot / tampoput
sulker (often a woman)

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Filipino Brooms

There are two words in the dictionary that can serve as translations for the English “broom.”

The simple noun that is widely used is walis.

Up until a few decades ago, the word pamalis (pangwalis) was also common, and if you use it today, it can still be understood, because it is a conjugation of the verb walis and it literally means “something used for sweeping.”

Brooms of the Philippines

There are two types of native brooms used in the Philippines — the walis tingting for outdoors and the walis tambo for smooth floors indoors and perhaps on the patio.

Walis-tingting is a broom made from the thin midribs of palm leaves. The stiff ribs are tied up on one end. It is usually paired with a simply constructed dustpan, as you can see in the picture. The can used for the dustpan is usually a cutout of an aluminum can of cooking oil.

Walis Tingting at Daspan

walis tingting at daspan
broom and “dustpan”

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Ang Sampung Utos ng Diyos

The Ten (10) Commandments of God are listed twice in the Bible — first in Chapter 20 of the Book of Exodus, and also in Chapter 5 of the Deuteronomy. Most Filipinos being Christian, the Bible is read and taught widely in the Philippines.

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PANDAKOT

root word: dakot

This is the native Tagalog word for a dustpan, the implement you use together with a broom for cleaning.

Walis Tingting at Daspan

Showing off native resourcefulness, many Filipinos often use the cutout of a large aluminum can of cooking oil for creating a dustpan. Take a close look at the photo. 🙂

walis tingting at pandakot
broom and dustpan

Ang pandakot ay isang kasangkapang panlinis na karaniwang katambal ng walis. A dustpan is a cleaning tool that is commonly paired with a broom.

In many cases, Filipinos simply use the non-standard English-derived word daspan.

15 Filipino Superstitions For The New Year

Happy New Year 2017 !!!

There are so many interesting Filipino superstitions or folk beliefs associated with New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day in the Philippines. Filipinos say you should observe the following customs and traditions to ensure that the new year being welcomed is a prosperous one. Many of these superstitions bear a strong Chinese influence.

PREPARE FOR NEW YEAR’S EVE

1. Make as much noise as you can to scare away evil spirits.

2. Turn on all lights so that the coming year is bright.

3. Open all doors, windows, cabinets and drawers to let good fortune in.

4. Debts must be paid off. Fill you wallet with fresh peso bills. (Filipinos believe that whatever your financial state is in at the stroke of midnight, so it will be in the new year.)

5. Clean everything.

6. Wear polka-dots. Anything round signifies prosperity.

7. Scatter coins around the house, on tabletops…. inside drawers…

8. Jump twelve times at midnight to increase your height. (Observed by Filipino children.)

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New Year’s Eve in the Philippines

Media Noche (Spanish for “midnight”) or Bisperas ng Bagong Taon (“New Year’s Eve” in Tagalog) is a festive time in the Philippines. There are a lot of traditions that Filipinos follow in the belief of ushering in a prosperous New Year. Many of these customs you may recognize as bearing Chinese influence.

FILIPINO FOOD ON NEW YEAR’S EVE

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